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How to Tell if Your Cat is Stressed?

 


Stress in owned cats!

 Domestic cats are exposed to a variety of stressful stimuli, which can affect a cat's well-being and cause a number of behavioral changes. Some of the most common stressors cats face include environmental changes, cat-to-cat conflicts, poor human-cat relationships, and the cat's inability to adapt to a new environment.

Stress also increases the risk of cats exhibiting urination and some forms of aggression, including redirected aggression.

A number of compulsive disorders such as excessive grooming can develop as a result of stressful environments.

 Why is my cat stressed?

Some of the key strategies for preventing or reducing stress-related behavior problems in cats are appropriate environmental enrichment.

Management techniques for introducing unfamiliar cats to each other and using a synthetic analog of the feline facial pheromone. Because the stress response in cats depends, to a large extent, on the temperament of the animal, husbandry and breeding strategies that contribute to the development of a balanced temperament in cats are also very useful.

In pets, stressors can be easily divided into:

·       Physical stress

·       Social pressures resulting from interactions with like-minded individuals

·       Pressures related to relationships with people.

·       Depending on its duration, stress is classified as acute or chronic.

 Stressors have additive effects, which means that when several stressors collide with an animal at the same time, the resulting stress response will be much higher than if the animal were under stress or simply.

Stress in pets is important for several reasons.

 First, when it is severe or long-lasting enough to overwhelm the animal's ability to cope, stress has a negative effect on the individual's well-being.

 Second, stress-related behavioral changes can be particularly troublesome for owners and, as a result, stress-related problems are a very common reason for dogs and cats to be abandoned and euthanized.

In addition, it is clear that in these cases, the human-animal bond can be negatively affected.

 Many behavioral changes in cats, such as certain exclusionary problems, aggressive behaviors or compulsions, are associated with stress.

 Causes, Signs, and Treatment of Stress in Cats

 Domestic cats are exposed to a variety of stress triggers that can have a negative impact on a cat's well-being.

Some of the most common stressors cats face include:

The inability of the cat to perform highly motivated behaviors.

 Stress is very likely to reduce food intake, and stress-related loss of appetite can contribute to the development of potentially serious medical conditions.Stress also increases the cat's risk of showing signs of urination and some forms of aggression, including redirected aggression.

Production strategy can influence cat behavior

 A number of compulsive disorders such as excessive grooming can develop as a result of stressful environments. Some of the key strategies for preventing or reducing stress-related behavior problems in cats are environmental enrichment, appropriate management techniques for introducing unfamiliar cats to one another, and the use of a synthetic feline pheromone analog. 

Because the stress response in cats depends, to a large extent, on the temperament of the animal, breeding and reproductive strategies that contribute to the development of a balanced temperament in cats are also very useful.

Stress by cat breed

Regarding the effect of breed, some authors have concluded that Persian and Siamese cats are more interactive (more playful, curious and friendly) than non-breed cats, while others have pointed out that Bengali cats record the highest aggression towards their owners and Persians. scores the lowest in activity.

Some studies have shown that orange cats are more aggressive and darker colored cats more sociable than cats with other coat colors.

The effects of early experiences on mood are described in several articles. For example, cat breeding was reported by an experienced mother.Weaned at an older age have fewer behavioral problems (including inability to control biting and frustration associated with aggression) compared to cats weaned early or raised by an inexperienced mother.

In addition, cats born to mothers who are undernourished and generally exhibit poor maternal behavior are likely to develop behavioral abnormalities.

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